Trusting Stars With Your Wishes Might Not Be Your Best Bet

    I’ll just apologize firsthand, I’m not trying to kill children’s dreams, nor am I trying to insult the song from that Diney Movie Pinocchio. Personally, I liked that movie (even though that theme park that turned children into donkeys gave me a few nightmares), but it’s a bit preposterous to say ‘when you wish upon a star your dreams come true.’

    I’ll just give it to you straight. 1. Stars don’t CARE about your dreams, they’re not alive. And 2. They’re too HOT that they’ll burn your dreams the moment they touch them.

    The surface of certain stars can reach to about 50,000 degrees Kelvin, which 89,530.33 degrees Fahrenheit if you’re American, or, if you’re one of the smart countries who measure by Celsius, it’s 49,727 degrees C. Though dreams are not physical, and they certainly are not measurable matter, I’m pretty sure even the air your dream exists in will burn and turn to plasma the moment it touches a star. Just saying. Stars really won’t treat your dreams well.

    If giving your dreams to stars to turn to plasma is your thing, be my guest. If that’s what motivates you, gives you some vision for the future, then by all means, I will not stop you. But having a dream is more than just waiting for some blue-garbed magical fairy to step in and fulfill it. Unfortunately, when we grow older, it seems we can attribute less and less things to magic. It made sense then, but when you’re an adult, people would only laugh at you if you truly believed the reason anything happened was because of magic(unless you’re J.R.R. Tolkien or J.K. Rowling who can make magic real in books.). If you were in some scientific discussion and brought up magic as a reason, you would be dismissed immediately, and probably put in the happy house with the loonies. (What’s up Doc?)

    I personally hate downplaying magic. I would love it if magic were real, and I can recount many times when I wished with all my heart that something would take me off to some distant land with magic. As I say this, I still wish for that. But seeing as I’m typing this right now, I’m pretty sure that hasn’t happened yet. And, I doubt it will. By human will alone, we cannot create magic.

    The Bible sort of gets downplayed for its miracles for that very reason as well. You Christians out there, I bet you’ve questioned whether or not some things in the Bible are actual historical accounts or not. Unless you witnessed a miracle at an extremely young age and you still remember it to this very day, I really doubt you haven’t questioned their existence. It’s hard to believe in miracles, when you’re in America, an extremely fortunate country at the moment, and you haven’t seen one for your very own eyes. I’m not saying miracles do not occur, but here, they’re not as likely to happen.

    Because you know what? America is a wealthy, fortunate country. Jesus did miracles in poor, humble places that really needed help. Sure, God does miracles here, but there’s never been a need for some huge, earth-shattering miracle here in the US because we don’t need one. So, us rich folks, we’re going to have a harder time finding magic or miracles in anything, because frankly, we don’t believe we need it, and we don’t need it most of the time.

    What’s the use in dreams anyway then? Why even work for something that’s so uncertain, so fuzzy, so cloudy to the point you really don’t know if you’re about to fall off a cliff or not? I am someone who lives in the moment, so I wonder this sometimes. At times, it seems pointless, maybe even stupid to be trying to decide your future when you really don’t know how to steer.

    But that’s exactly what we need: direction. Whether or not you know how to make a boat go straight or you’re sending yourself in circles, it helps to have a direction to follow. I know the ending point of this blog, so even though I’m not writing everything I maybe had wanted to say, and maybe I’m writing too much, I still have an end point to reach. Wandering aimlessly kind of stinks, and can be scary in the wrong situations.

    And relying on solely on your past to determine your future might be a bad thing. Unfortunately, us humans tend to remember more bad things than good things anyway. Unless we have enough good things in our life to balance out the bad, we stick with mostly bad memories. So if you’re trying to determine your future by your past? I’ve read and watched too many books and shows to know that people sticking to revenge, sticking to their past, they usually end up with no point in life at the end or they die.

    If you want a smart person’s view on how we remember bad stuff, have this New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/24/your-money/why-people-remember-negative-events-more-than-positive-ones.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    So you see? It’s natural that our pasts are going to be filled with bad stuff because that’s what we remember. So, even though yes, our pasts are important to shaping our lives, letting what we remember determine our entire lives might not be our smartest bet.

    Lesson this week? Have a Dream, and pursue it. It might be the compass to lead you to your future. It might lead you to somewhere different then where you intend to go, but it’s still somewhere. My dream is to be a writer, and you’re watching my process right now, by reading this writing I’ve made. See where it’s lead me? If you don’t, it’s okay, I’m working on it. Maybe your direction won’t be so tangible, but it’s certainly something to work with. Artists can’t make art if they don’t have the materials to make it. Writers can’t be writers if they never bother to write and wait for some magic fairy to carry their pen across a page. So start something, and see where you end up.

    See you next week!

    A.C. Rooks

    

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